Switching to LED: What Can It Save You?

Some of us resist the switch to efficient lighting, even some who embraced the compact fluorescent, just can’t seem to accept LED lighting around the house.

Warm living room lighting is energy efficient and saves money on electricity. Photo: GE.

Warm living room lighting is energy efficient and saves money on electricity. Photo: GE.

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LEDs Change Thinking About the Light Bulb

Philips sells a range of energy-enhancing lights, including the goLITE BLU, a panel of blue LEDs.

Philips sells a range of energy-enhancing lights, including the goLITE BLU, a panel of blue LEDs.

Lights are no longer just for lighting.

With the development of LED lamp technology, the lowly light bulb is doing more than turning on and off. A lamp can be the centerpiece of an environment meant to improve health, moods and even food.

LEDs can create light in multiple colors, generate less heat and use a fraction of the energy of older types of bulbs. And LEDs can be controlled remotely from a PC or smartphone app, as programmable as a television. Continue reading

Shift In Lighting Technologies to Dim Energy Use By End of Decade, says IHS

A fundamental paradigm shift in lighting technologies toward more efficient lamps and bulbs will significantly reduce global electricity demand for general illumination in the next few years, according to IHS.

The energy usage of the installed base of lighting technologies for general illumination will fall to a projected 2.75 trillion kilowatt-hours (kWh) by 2020, down 24% from 3.61 trillion kWh in 2013. Overall, the installed base for general lighting-which covers homes, businesses and street lamps but not architectural or theatrical lighting-will account for 10.3% of the net electricity generated in 2020, down from 16.4% in 2013. Continue reading

LEDs Turn Out The Light On Incandescents And CFLs

Most people have accepted that it’s all but over for old incandescent bulbs. But CFLs—compact fluorescent bulbs, the titular replacements for incandescents—may be rapidly becoming extinct as well.

Light bulbs have evolved from the standard incandescent (right) to compact fluorescents and now LEDs (left), which come in a variety of shapes -- some quite familiar in appearance.

Light bulbs have evolved from the standard incandescent (right) to compact fluorescents and now LEDs (left), which come in a variety of shapes — some quite familiar in appearance.

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LEDs Boost Economy In Many Ways

Watch industry news these days and one topic comes up time and again: LED lighting. And for once the talk is all positive. In fact, practically every sector that has something to say about it seems to be saying that it could be a saving grace in our struggling economy.

Obviously the lighting industry is stoked about the new-found popularity of LED lighting. According to the LED Lighting Market Report that was recently released, the global LED lighting market is expected to grow 45 percent each year through 2019. Considering the market was worth $4.8 billion in 2012, that would make it worth $42 billion annually by 2019. Even more, these figures are based solely on the current sales value of 60-watt incandescent bulbs. The numbers don’t even take other size and wattage bulbs into account in their figures. Recent developments in LED technology that have created viable LED options for higher-output options like PAR38 replacement bulbs are certain to boost these numbers even higher. This explosive growth is expanding LED lighting manufacture operations as fast as they can build and staff them, both in North America and across the globe in the facilities that supply raw components to companies here at home.

Sales of LED are projected to grow by 45 percent a year until 2019. The home decorating market is just one of many sectors driving sales of LEDs.

Sales of LED are projected to grow by 45 percent a year until 2019. The home decorating market is just one of many sectors driving sales of LEDs.

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Look For More LEDs In 2014 As Old Bulbs Die Out

Consumers in the United States have been witnessing the gradual disappearance of old general-purpose incandescent light bulbs from store shelves since 2012. This is happening because of the adoption of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, which bans the manufacture and sale of certain bulbs. The 100-watt bulb was the first to go, phased out in 2012. It was followed by the 75-watt bulb this year. Now, as 2014 begins, 40- and 60-watt bulbs will begin to disappear as well. Retailers will be able to sell existing inventory, but no new bulbs with these wattages will be made.

US consumers will have to find alternatives to the popular 40- and 60-watt incandescent bulb that has been a mainstay of homes for more than a century. The ban on general-purpose incandescent bulbs takes effect January 1, 2014.

US consumers will have to find alternatives to the popular 40- and 60-watt incandescent bulb that has been a mainstay of homes for more than a century. The ban on general-purpose incandescent bulbs takes effect January 1, 2014.

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Shine On, You Crazy Lightbulbs

The other day I found myself at a loss in the light bulb aisle of my hardware store. I might as well have been shopping for a carburetor. There were too many options with too many symbols and verbiage that I couldn’t decipher (LED, CFL, halogen, lumens, Kelvin, CRI), not to mention all of the various brands (GE, Philips, Cree, EcoSmart — each with its own packaging lingo). Since when do you need an electrical engineering degree to buy a light bulb?

This fluorescent energy saving light bulb (CFL) is illuminated by electrical wires inserted in the back of the bulb base. It is in a garden with primarily green plants. (Richard Goerg/Getty Images)

This fluorescent energy saving light bulb (CFL) is illuminated by electrical wires inserted in the back of the bulb base. It is in a garden with primarily green plants. (Richard Goerg/Getty Images)

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Short Guide to Choosing LED Lights

After 134 years, the incandescent light bulb has finally outlived its usefulness. Incandescent bulbs are disappearing from store shelves in the US and many more will be gone within a few months. For those of us who forgot to hoard light bulbs, what are we to do the next time we are left in the dark?  As we put to bed our old favorites, 60 and 40 watt bulbs, it is time to look to the future and make the best replacement choices for ourselves and the environment. That look to the future is filled with hints and mentions of LED lighting and the recent advances that have made it into a truly viable solution to our lighting dilemma.

Choose a combination of task and decorative LED lighting for the bathroom. For covered fixtures, check the heat dissipation properties of the bulb

Choose a combination of task and decorative LED lighting for the bathroom. For covered fixtures, check the heat dissipation properties of the bulb

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DOE Releases Report On LED Environmental Testing

From Light Directory, March 29th, 2013

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has released a new study addressing the potential environmental impacts from landfill disposal of three light-source technologies used in residential homes: incandescent, compact fluorescent (CFL), and LED. All three lamp types contained some hazardous elements which, while generally below Federal landfill limits, in some instances exceeded the more restrictive California limits. Continue reading

Buying Bulbs, Saving for Our Future

By Monique O’Grady

This year’s holiday electric bill will probably be a belated gift. This Department of Energy stat shows why: the estimated electricity cost to light a 6-foot tree with C-9 incandescent light strands will add $10.00 to an energy bill during a 40-day holiday season. But, by using C-9 LED strands, the cost is just 27 cents. I used three LED strands on my tree, but I also changed out an additional seven strands for other decorating needs. That should make a noticeable difference.

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), if every decorative light string purchased in the United States this year earned the ENERGY STAR, we would: Continue reading