Restaurant Lighting

Restaurants are the most energy intensive commercial buildings in the United States according to the Energy Information Administration. Restaurants, per square foot, consume nearly three times the energy of the average commercial building. Closets, storage rooms, break rooms and even walk-in refrigerators are great candidates for occupancy sensors. Exit signs using LEDs are a great alternative to incandescent-based signs.

Lighting accounts for nearly 13% of all the energy used in a restaurant. It is one of the easiest places to save money.

Akron, OH

Dairy Queen

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Finding High-Wattage LED Replacement Bulbs

In the lighting world, there are few bulb configurations as popular and widely used as halogen PAR38 bulbs. These sturdy and versatile lamps have found their way into just about every location in our modern lives. We use them in businesses and homes, inside and out. We love our PAR38 light bulbs—but we hate to pay for all the electricity they use. Another problem with them is that after July, standard halogen PAR38 bulbs will no longer be available in the United States thanks to the next round of light bulb bans. Although they have been a long time coming, there are now several LED options available, some of which you would actually consider buying.

Vintage cars under LED lights at National Automobile Museum.

Vintage cars under LED lights at National Automobile Museum.

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Look For More LEDs In 2014 As Old Bulbs Die Out

Consumers in the United States have been witnessing the gradual disappearance of old general-purpose incandescent light bulbs from store shelves since 2012. This is happening because of the adoption of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, which bans the manufacture and sale of certain bulbs. The 100-watt bulb was the first to go, phased out in 2012. It was followed by the 75-watt bulb this year. Now, as 2014 begins, 40- and 60-watt bulbs will begin to disappear as well. Retailers will be able to sell existing inventory, but no new bulbs with these wattages will be made.

US consumers will have to find alternatives to the popular 40- and 60-watt incandescent bulb that has been a mainstay of homes for more than a century. The ban on general-purpose incandescent bulbs takes effect January 1, 2014.

US consumers will have to find alternatives to the popular 40- and 60-watt incandescent bulb that has been a mainstay of homes for more than a century. The ban on general-purpose incandescent bulbs takes effect January 1, 2014.

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Organic LEDs, The Next Generation of Office Lighting?

According to estimates from New York’s Research Development Authority (NYSERDA), about 40 percent of electricity in the US is consumed by office buildings. One upstate company, OLEDWorks, is developing technology that could help to lower this consumption.

Credit: Some rights reserved by Greg Marshall

Credit: Some rights reserved by Greg Marshall

The company’s developing organic L-E-D technology, or OLEDs, as a more efficient alternative for lighting the nation’s office spaces. Continue reading

DOE Announces $10.1M in Round 4 of New Investments to Drive Cost-Competitive LED Lighting

The US DOE has announced $10.1 million in funding to five companies for R&D intended to lower the cost of energy-efficient SSL lighting.

As a response to the SSL Manufacturing R&D funding opportunity announcement made in December, the US. Department of Energy (DOE) has competitively selected five projects for solid-state lighting (SSL) to receive the fourth round of funding. The two-year projectsLED will focus on reducing costs while maintaining quality by improving the quality and performance of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Total DOE funding for the five projects is $10.1 million, while the five companies will put in a matching $10.1 million investment. Continue reading

Cleveland Public Power to Test LED Street Lights for 2 Years

By Leila Atassi, The Plain Dealer 

CLEVELAND, Ohio — Residents and motorists in several Cleveland neighborhoods will see their streets in a different light next month — when the warm glow of traditional street lights is replaced by the white illumination of energy-efficient LED’s.

For two years beginning May 1, city-owned Cleveland Public Power will test four varieties of LED street lights on both sides of the city and downtown to gauge efficiency, coverage and how well they hold up to harsh Cleveland weather.

A worker changes a city street light. The city of Cleveland will begin testing energy-efficient LEDs in areas of the city on May 1. Plain Dealer File.

A worker changes a city street light. The city of Cleveland will begin testing energy-efficient LEDs in areas of the city on May 1. Plain Dealer File.

Mayor Frank Jackson first unveiled the plan in 2011, a year after the administration launched an unsuccessful effort to find a company willing to sell the city LED lights in exchange for creating jobs. Continue reading

Buying Bulbs, Saving for Our Future

By Monique O’Grady

This year’s holiday electric bill will probably be a belated gift. This Department of Energy stat shows why: the estimated electricity cost to light a 6-foot tree with C-9 incandescent light strands will add $10.00 to an energy bill during a 40-day holiday season. But, by using C-9 LED strands, the cost is just 27 cents. I used three LED strands on my tree, but I also changed out an additional seven strands for other decorating needs. That should make a noticeable difference.

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), if every decorative light string purchased in the United States this year earned the ENERGY STAR, we would: Continue reading