Business Loves LED Lighting; Consumers are Catching Up

Wherever you go these days, you see businesses switching their lighting systems from old-fashioned incandescent or harsh fluorescent to bright and shiny new LEDs. The local supermarket, the office where you work, the train station, restaurant or department store—all of these businesses are seeing the benefits of this rapidly developing technology. The light produced by LED bulbs is brighter and warmer and more focused than ever before, and business owners love the savings to their energy bills. But what about consumers?

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Businesses, especially retail, are moving to LED lighting. In Japan, market penetration is over 50 percent and expected to hit 90 percent. Consumers are slower to embrace the technology, balking at the high cost of a bulb. But that is changing.

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Look For More LEDs In 2014 As Old Bulbs Die Out

Consumers in the United States have been witnessing the gradual disappearance of old general-purpose incandescent light bulbs from store shelves since 2012. This is happening because of the adoption of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, which bans the manufacture and sale of certain bulbs. The 100-watt bulb was the first to go, phased out in 2012. It was followed by the 75-watt bulb this year. Now, as 2014 begins, 40- and 60-watt bulbs will begin to disappear as well. Retailers will be able to sell existing inventory, but no new bulbs with these wattages will be made.

US consumers will have to find alternatives to the popular 40- and 60-watt incandescent bulb that has been a mainstay of homes for more than a century. The ban on general-purpose incandescent bulbs takes effect January 1, 2014.

US consumers will have to find alternatives to the popular 40- and 60-watt incandescent bulb that has been a mainstay of homes for more than a century. The ban on general-purpose incandescent bulbs takes effect January 1, 2014.

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